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Takata Recall Team
Department of Transportation

Kerry Kolodziej
Kara Fischer
Stephen Hench
Lucia Sanchez
Nicholas LaBruna

Kerry Kolodziej

Kara Fischer

Stephen Hench

Lucia Sanchez

Nicholas LaBruna


The Takata Recall Expansion: Keeping Our Eye on Safety

Most Americans likely react to the Takata air bag recall with a mix of worry and frustration — and for good reason. This is one of the largest and most complex recalls in automotive history. It involves more than 70 million air bags installed in tens of millions of cars and trucks. Sadly, Takata air bags have now been linked to 16 deaths in the United States.

The Takata Air Bag Recall team demonstrated outstanding performance, dedicated support to the goal of replacing the dangerous air bags as soon as is safely possible, and a public education effort to provide accurate, timely, and relevant information. This team supported the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) mission to save lives on our roads and highways, serve the American public with critically important information, and demonstrated good stewardship by focusing the Takata recall efforts to help maximize completion rates.

Understanding a challenge helps overcome it. Replacing all of these air bags will take time — and a large amount of patience. While millions have already been replaced, many vehicle owners will wait for their vehicle to be repaired. That’s because older air bags with long-term exposure to heat and humidity are at a higher risk for ruptures that can injure and even kill.

NHTSA wants to continuously update the public on the Takata recall, the agency’s actions, and the critical steps we hope every American will take to protect themselves and their neighbors. The agency’s website, NHTSA.gov, and the VIN lookup tool have been key tools for providing this information to the public. Since May of 2018, more than 12 million users have checked their VIN on the NHTSA website, and more than 33 million users have come to the website for information.


-Important Consumer Information About the Recall-

A Serious Threat. Vehicles with Takata air bags that have experienced prolonged exposure to hot and humid conditions pose a much greater risk of a rupture, which is why repairs are prioritized according to these factors. The oldest of the recalled Takata air bags, which were included in some 2001, 2002, and 2003 Honda and Acura vehicles, pose a very serious threat to safety. If you own one of these vehicles, NHTSA urges you not to drive them unless they have been repaired. If you know someone who owns one, please ask if they’ve checked for recalls.

Check for Recalls. Whether or not you believe your vehicle is affected by this recall, we urge all Americans to check for recalls. [V]isit NHTSA.gov/recalls and enter your vehicle’s 17-digit vehicle identification number, or VIN](https://www.nhtsa.gov/recalls#vin). You’ll know in seconds if your vehicle is subject to a recall and how to get it addressed at no charge. All recalls are serious and affect your safety. A complete list of vehicles affected by the Takata recall is available here.

Get Alerted. Once you’ve checked for recalls, sign up for Recall Alerts, too. If your vehicle is included in a future safety recall you’ll receive an email letting you know. While manufactures are required to contact vehicle owners of recalled vehicles, older vehicles often pass through many owners making it more difficult to notify the current owner.

Progress in Repairs. Millions of Takata air bags have already been replaced. However, millions more must still be fixed. Each month, NHTSA compiles completion rates for vehicles included in the Takata recall. The data is compiled by the type of air bag as well by Make.